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Country Guides for Europe

Gibraltar

Gibraltar Gibraltar is a surprising mix of sights and cultures, where one can enjoy a ploughman's lunch in a British style pub, catch a glimpse of Morocco (and a monkey or two) from the top of the Rock where caverns and manmade tunnels bear witness to both natural and military history, then take a cave tour - all without leaving this tiny 6 ½ square mile country.

Language: English (official), Spanish, Italian, Portuguese

Major International Airports:

City

Airport
Airport
Code
Distance
From City
GibraltarGibraltar AirportKBP0.5 miles S

The preventive measures you need to take while traveling in Western Europe depend on the areas you visit and the length of time you stay. For most areas of this region, you should observe health precautions similar to those that would apply while traveling in the United States.

Travelers’ diarrhea, the number one illness in travelers, can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or parasites, which can contaminate food or water. Infections may cause diarrhea and vomiting (E. coli, Salmonella, cholera, and parasites), fever (typhoid fever and toxoplasmosis), or liver damage (hepatitis). Make sure your food and drinking water are safe.

Tickborne encephalitis, a viral infection of the central nervous system, occurs chiefly in Central and Western Europe. Travelers are at risk who visit or work in forested areas during the summer months and who consume unpasteurized dairy products. The vaccine for this disease is not available in the United States at this time. To prevent tickborne encephalitis, as well as Lyme disease, travelers should take precautions to prevent tick bites.

There is no risk for yellow fever in Western Europe. A certificate of yellow fever vaccination may be required for entry into certain of these countries if you are coming from countries in South America or sub-Saharan Africa. Find the nearest authorized U.S. yellow fever vaccine center.

CDC recommends the following vaccines (as appropriate for age):

See your doctor at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for shots to take effect.

  • Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG). You are not at increased risk in Northern, Western, and Southern Europe, including the Mediterranean regions of Italy and Greece.
  • Hepatitis B, if you might be exposed to blood (for example, health-care workers), have sexual contact with the local population, stay longer than 6 months in Southern Europe, or be exposed through medical treatment.
  • As needed, booster doses for tetanus-diphtheria. Hepatitis B vaccine is now recommended for all infants and for children ages 11–12 years who did not complete the series as infants.

All travelers should take the following precautions, no matter the destination:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water.
  • Because motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury among travelers, walk and drive defensively. Avoid travel at night if possible and always use seat belts.
  • Always use latex condoms to reduce the risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Don’t eat or drink dairy products unless you know they have been pasteurized.
  • Don’t share needles with anyone.
  • Never eat undercooked ground beef and poultry, raw eggs, and unpasteurized dairy products. Raw shellfish is particularly dangerous to persons who have liver disease or compromised immune systems. (Travelers to Western Europe should also see the information on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease) and New Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (nvCJD).)

Travelers to rural or undeveloped areas should take the following precautions:

To stay healthy, do...

  • Drink only bottled or boiled water, or carbonated (bubbly) drinks in cans or bottles. Avoid tap water, fountain drinks, and ice cubes. If this is not possible, make water safer by BOTH filtering through an “absolute 1-micron or less” filter AND adding iodine tablets to the filtered water. “Absolute 1-micron filters” are found in camping/outdoor supply stores.
  • Eat only thoroughly cooked food or fruits and vegetables you have peeled yourself. Remember: boil it, cook it, peel it, or forget it.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites:
    • Pay special attention to mosquito protection between dusk and dawn.
    • Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
    • Use insect repellents that contain DEET (diethylmethyltoluamide).
    • Read and follow the directions and precautions on the product label.
    • Apply insect repellent to exposed skin.
    • Do not put repellent on wounds or broken skin.
    • Do not breathe in, swallow, or get into the eyes (DEET is toxic if swallowed). If using a spray product, apply DEET to your face by spraying your hands and rubbing the product carefully over the face, avoiding eyes and mouth.
    • Unless you are staying in air-conditioned or well-screened housing, purchase a bed net impregnated with the insecticide permethrin or deltamethrin. Or, spray the bed net with one of these insecticides if you are unable to find a pretreated bed net.
    • DEET may be used on adults, children, and infants older than 2 months of age. Protect infants by using a carrier draped with mosquito netting with an elastic edge for a tight fit.
    • Children under 10 years old should not apply insect repellent themselves. Do not apply to young children’s hands or around eyes and mouth.
  • To prevent fungal and parasitic infections, keep feet clean and dry, and do not go barefoot.


Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Download Magellan's Chart of Insect Protection and Water Purification Needs by CountryDownload Magellan's Chart of Insect Protection and Water Purification Needs by Country

There is little risk of contracting insect-borne disease in Gibraltar.

The municipal water supply in Gibralter is considered safe for drinking.

Sorry, no information available.

The climate in Gibraltar is Mediterranean, with hot, humid, dry summers and mild winters. The majority of the rain falls during the winter months.


City
Annual
Precip. Days
Annual
Precip. Totals
Gibraltar5926"

Gibraltar's electrical current is 240/50 (volts/hz) and uses the plug adaptors listed to the right under Related Items. Many North American appliances are designed to operate only within the 100-125 volt range. These appliances will suffer damage if plugged into 220-250 volts without the proper transformer or converter.

To determine which plug adaptors you'll need and if you'll require a transformer or converter, use our Electrical Connection Wizard.

For a detailed discussion of international electrical standards, see our related article on Electrical and Phone Adaptation.

Download Magellan's Guide to World Electrical ConnectionsDownload Magellan's Guide to World Electrical Connections

Sorry, no information available.

The time zone for Gibraltar is 1 hours offset from GMT, which means that if it is 12:00 noon in New York, the time in Gibraltar would be 6:00 pm

The unit of currency in Gibraltar is the Gibraltar pound (GIP).

Look up the current exchange rate using XE.com's Universal Currency Converter

Traveled to Gibraltar?

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Other Travelers' Experiences in Gibraltar

"Gibraltar is quite small, so you can probably experience most of the significant sites within 2 days: St. Marks's Cave, the Siege Tunnels, the WWII Tunnels, the wild Barbary monkeys, and the cable-car to the mid-section of the Rock (Only the WWII caves are closed on Sunday). You should also wander off the main shopping street into the smaller side streets which extend from it on either side. Great choice of cuisine - Moroccan, Indian, English (the real fish-and-chips), Jewish, etc."
- Neil Kuchinsky, Colonial Heights, VA,